How thick are your windows?

Discussion in 'House Building Forum' started by Wayne Thompson, Aug 10, 2019.

  1. Wayne Thompson

    Wayne Thompson Active Member

    We are almost finished building a house near prasat, Surin. All we have left to put in are the windows.

    I said in passing to my wife that we should get double glazing and then tried to explain to her what that means.

    She has talked to a few windows shops and of course they don't do that in isaan but they have come back with this technique of sandwiching together two 3mm sheets with a film in the middle.

    One shop said this will stop it from shattering if it breaks and reduce noise.

    Another shop said the problem is over time the film will degrade and it wont look as good to look through.

    They said they can do it but suggested instead to use a single 6mm glass sheet for each window with is cheaper.

    Does anyone have experience with this double sheet with the laminate?

    What is the best option?
     
  2. Bandersnatch

    Bandersnatch Surin Legend

    8cm

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  3. Bandersnatch

    Bandersnatch Surin Legend

    Another option would be to buy 2 sliding windows per opening, assuming your walls are thick enough to support double windows.

    [​IMG]
     
    gotlost likes this.
  4. Wayne Thompson

    Wayne Thompson Active Member

    Haha, that is a unique build.

    Didn't think about doing a double window. It's an option.
     
    Bandersnatch likes this.
  5. nomad97

    nomad97 Ordinary member

  6. mario299

    mario299 Surin Legend

    My question to you is why do you want insulated (double-pane) windows?
    Is it to reduce noise?...keep your home cooler?...other reasons?

    I have a many year background of selling and installing replacement windows in the U.S., but when we built our home here in 2008, I came to understand that I really didn't need the extra expense of that type of window here. We are not in the city so noise was not a factor, and even though we do have air con for the house, we rarely feel the need to use it.

    Proper size of windows (larger than most Thai homes), and good landscaping for trees and shade, allow us to have the windows open most of the time for good ventilation and cooling. The main house has 5 big windows (200 x 140) and 2 smaller (100 x 140), and the dining room has 3 large and one smaller.

    Our window guy is the son-in-law of our neighbor and does excellent work, and his shop is in Prasat. Let me know if you would like to contact him.
     
    Ivor the Engine likes this.
  7. Wayne Thompson

    Wayne Thompson Active Member

    Good point.

    I just thought it would save on aircon bill. But the cost would be not that much and the money could probably be put towards solar instead.

    It's always good to make sure you are solving the right problem.
    Our windows are large and plentiful so shade may be the solution.

    I realise I probably don't need uPVC system.

    What I am confused with now is it better to get the 2 x 3mm with laminate in the middle or a single 5 or 6mm pane? (Remembering I know nothing about windows, you may ask why I am asking again, I was just given options).
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2019
    Ivor the Engine likes this.
  8. mario299

    mario299 Surin Legend

    Look at cost comparison between the two choices...is the difference important? The potential for the laminate to discolor is definitely something to consider.
    If I were to do windows again, I would make sure that the frame was properly constructed and the glass unit was clear, clean and structurally sound as well. Make sure they get properly installed and sealed, and you should be good.
     
  9. Wayne Thompson

    Wayne Thompson Active Member

    Good Tips. Thanks.
     
  10. Coffee

    Coffee Surin Legend

    Nice to see the Gatling gun installed on L3.
    Don't forget - practice makes perfect (and wear your hearing protection).
    Just let me know when you require another case of 5.56mm ammo. ;)
     
  11. Ivor the Engine

    Ivor the Engine Administrator

    Do you have a twin-walled construction with an air-gap between your wall?
    Talk to Alan the Builder. He always gives good advice.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
    Wayne Thompson likes this.
  12. Bandersnatch

    Bandersnatch Surin Legend

    Hi Wayne you are welcome to visit my nearly completed build and we can discuss insulation and solar - my system is being installed this month.

    I live near the Ford Dealer in Surin
     
  13. Merlin

    Merlin Surin Legend

    If the only reason for seeking a non-standard glazing system is to save energy by insulation, then the thickness of the glass - with or without the laminate - is most unlikely to ever repay the intitial cost. Glass is very good at transmitting heat/cold, i.e. thermal transmission, and the ONLY way to improve heat gain or loss at windows is to provide a "thermal break," the most common of which is an air-gap/gaps between two or more panes as in double or triple glazing.

    Many years ago, the air gap in UK double glazing was usually 6mm to 12mm, but even 12mm was relatively ineffective compared with the 25mm airgaps that could be accommodate by using secondary glazing units, where two glazed frames were used together to create that gap. Different gasses could be used too, as some transmit heat less efficiently than air alone.

    In Thailand, the ratio between glazed areas and unglazed areas of external walls will affect the amount of heat gained from sunlight (and inside/outside air temperatures) within rooms. In addition, the roof overhangs above windows will determine the shade available and the outside temperature at the glass.

    Wall construction methods will make big differences too. The Thai method of using single-skin construction allows a very high level of thermal transmission. Using a twin-skin with and air gap between them saves heat gain in two ways, the first being the thickness of the bricks themselves, and secondly the thermal break of the air gap too.

    If aircon is necessary to maintain comfortable temperatures in this climate, then appropriate double glazing in existing buildings, and an additional structural layer of brick or blockwork will reduce the running costs. Adding canopies outside windows to provide shade will also reduce running costs and improve comfort levels.

    Finally, providing more shade for your external walls, either by using canopies or other roof overhangs, with the option of judicious use of trees (only needed on walls exposed to direct sunlight) will also make a difference.
     
  14. Bandersnatch

    Bandersnatch Surin Legend

    I agree with everything that @Merlin said above. I tried to incorporate these ideas in my build:

    Windows: Smallest possibly ratio of glazed to unglazed. 7cm air gap in the double glazing. Windows positioned high up under the roof overhangs. The weakest link in the thermal envelope of a building are the window frames, so I don’t have any. Also the windows do not open so reducing leaks.

    Walls: painted white to reflect solar radiation. Constructed of double aerated concrete blocks with a foil radiant barrier attached to the external blocks, air gap, 3 inches of foam, air gap then interior blocks. Shaded by a wrap around roof of 5m white steel with foil wrapped foam insulation.

    To access the conditioned core of the building you need to pass through 2 doors to prevent warm moist air flooding in.
     
    Ivor the Engine likes this.
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