Rain?

Discussion in 'Surin News' started by nomad97, Mar 30, 2020.

  1. Ivor the Engine

    Ivor the Engine Nowhere man

    Most people here, seem to act like they are from a different planet!
     
    gotlost likes this.
  2. gotlost

    gotlost Cannot re - Member

    What is the over all size of your dig aka dam/pound:rolleyes::D:D:D
     
  3. Ivor the Engine

    Ivor the Engine Nowhere man

    lots of heavy rain in Sisaket all morning, on & off now!
     
  4. Rice

    Rice Cannot re - Member

    This new dam/pond #2 is 20m x 20m and 9 m deep. It tapers at about a 60 Degree angle.
    This is just after digging it was a renovation of a very crap pond that was about 2 m deep and caved in. Somebody needed dirt in a hurry some years back and just butchered a hole. The wife just recently bought it as it adjoins her land and the seller was a distressed seller and a long off relative as is 90% of the land around us as it all belonged to the wife's great great grandfather at one point.
    newdamA.jpg
    This is today after the big rain. Looks like it is holding about 2 to 3 m now.
    newdamB.jpg
     
    Cent, CO-CO, nomad97 and 1 other person like this.
  5. gotlost

    gotlost Cannot re - Member

    Did you hit the water table before it rained.?
     
  6. Rice

    Rice Cannot re - Member

    We did with Dam #1 and that is 8 m deep. But not this time. I think the water table has dropped some what in recent years. As you can see from the first picture it is dry at the bottom and some days later was still dry.
     
    Cent and gotlost like this.
  7. Prakhonchai Nick

    Prakhonchai Nick Cannot re - Member

    Interesting comment that the land "all belonged to the wife's great great grandfather"......If it is the same as in my village, then donkeys years ago, people who may have been Thai, but more likely Khmer, arrived in what is now the village, and shared between themselves the vacant land, built dwellings and laid claim to the land. Said land has remained in these families every since, being handed down to new generations. There is no legal title to any of the land. yet the villagers sell land to one another with the blessing of the village headman who keeps records. My wifes land almost 2 rai (I paid!!!) where I live, was bought from an aunt for "a song" as she had many gambling debts.
     
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  8. Rice

    Rice Cannot re - Member

    Common story yes. Strangely enough all the land around here is under Nor Sor 4 Chanote. There was a big project started in Isan in the 80's to fix that problem of no legal title. Funded by of all governments New Zealand. It was also New Zealand that built a lot of the broken down canal weirs in Isan as well, all built around that time. There is a lot of rusty old signs around Khon Kaen that mentions all this, but I have never seen anything on the internet. Obscure things that happened before the internet are just not on it. Bye the way around here they are neither Khmer or Laos. They are Kui/Kuy.
     
  9. CO-CO

    CO-CO Cannot re - Member


    I think my missus calls them "Suay" ...


     
    mario299 likes this.
  10. Rice

    Rice Cannot re - Member

    Is there any wonder the language is dying out. It is not even included in this video. All in Issan.
     
  11. Merlin

    Merlin Cannot re - Member

    One of the men in the video - the younger one - said that he doesn't want the language to die out. It's a common enough problem in many other parts of the world too. My own first language, Welsh, is thought by many to be dying out (though it is easy to disprove that claim.) Several factors in common with Suay have been involved. Firstly, neither language has a vast resource of written text. Welsh was effectively banned by English law some centuries ago, and the books of the time were burnt, though some survived. Children were punished at their schools if heard to speak anything but English - a subject that few of them understood well enough to communicate with. Another video states that the Khmer Rouge forbade the use of Kui/Suay in Cambodia, and it was inevitable that, under duress, habits would change.

    As both languages belonged to relatively poor groups, the advent of easier travel made access easier to more plentiful and better paid work elsewhere. As it has always been the younger generations that move away, when they return home, many have lost their mother tongue or become so unfamiliar with it that they use Thai instead (and English in Wales). Entertainment is a driving force too, with most media being in Thai here, and virtually none in Suay. In Wales, the language has survived in greater numbers partly because of the strong cultural traditions there, with two major festivals, both of which draw audiences from far afield, and in one case from all around the world where competitors wear their national costumes, which serves to preserve national identities and greater feelings of "belonging." Without such events, and as the older generation using the language fades away, the language itself becomes redundant. Why learn two or more languages when time and energy can be saved by learning just one? I don't wish to seem prejudiced, but as English is the "preferred" language in so many countries now, is it any wonder that most British people are monolingual now, as is the case, increasingly in Isaan, where dialects and so-called tribal languages (Suay etc) are being lost in favour of "Central" Thai?
     
    Coffee and Cent like this.
  12. Rice

    Rice Cannot re - Member

    Suay may be in decline. My wife did not learn her mothers tongue as her mother died quite young. The locals around here have set a project to educate her and bring her back into the fold so to speak. Pardon the pun. In Isaan there is no danger of Isaan laos being dropped anytime soon. They may drop Suay but never Isaan. Only Hiso people from Isaan deny they can speak Isaan as it is considered low class when in Pak Glang (Central Thailand) I have been told straight to my face that I am speaking a dirty language and making them sick. Guess what. I do it all the more.
    I have been told I speak Thai with an Isaan accent. I wonder how that happened? :rolleyes:
     
    mahdam, Cent, mario299 and 1 other person like this.
  13. nomad97

    nomad97 Ordinary member Staff Member

    Look out, this is coming our way!

    upload_2020-5-18_17-59-1.png
     
  14. Yorky

    Yorky Cannot re - Member

    There is no sign of it at my drum.
     
  15. nomad97

    nomad97 Ordinary member Staff Member

    It should be here, but it isn't.

    upload_2020-5-18_18-32-29.png

    upload_2020-5-18_18-33-19.png
     
  16. mario299

    mario299 Cannot re - Member

    CO-CO likes this.
  17. Yorky

    Yorky Cannot re - Member

    A little dark at present. Distant thunder but precipitation seems unlikely.
     
  18. Merlin

    Merlin Cannot re - Member

    Precipissing it down 2 Kms S of Big C right now.
     
    CO-CO likes this.
  19. Yorky

    Yorky Cannot re - Member

    We had a few drops. You'd need to bob and weave a bit to get wet.
     
  20. nomad97

    nomad97 Ordinary member Staff Member

    No, and before you ask, I do not play the lottery either.
     
    mario299 likes this.
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